Friday, January 27, 2012

The Little Church Around the Corner



It has been raining quite a bit lately here in New York City. The dark gloomy days of winter have been unseasonably warm, and I'm thankful we have not been besieged with snow and ice instead, but the rain does nothing to lift my spirits, as I miss and mourn my Mother. To lift my spirits, my husband invited me to have dinner this week at our favorite Italian restaurant in Manhattan, I Trulli, which is located in the Flatiron Gramacy neighborhood.  I took the express bus into Manhattan from Brooklyn and arriving little early I decided to walk around a bit.  At One East 29th Street (Between Fifth Avenue and Madison Avenue) I came upon the Church of the Transfiguration, also known as "The Little Church Around the Corner." 


The church history is explained briefly on its website: "Founded in October 1848, The Church of the Transfiguration is one of the most famous Episcopal parishes in the United States. For more than 160 years, The Church of the Transfiguration has been known for its inclusivity – welcoming individuals from all races, classes, sexual orientations, and other backgrounds. Established on what had been the outskirts of New York City in the mid-19th century, the church today is a visible worshipping community near the geographic center of Manhattan.

The Church of the Transfiguration was founded by the Rev. George Hendric Houghton, sometimes called one of the Saints of the American Church, who served as its rector for 49 years. In his ministry to those in need, he sheltered escaped slaves as part of the Underground Railroad and African-American families during the Draft Riots of the Civil War and welcomed members of the theater profession, something not common at the time."



"The Church of the Transfiguration is often called “The Little Church Around the Corner.”  The nickname dates back to 1870, when Joseph Jefferson – famous for his portrayal of Rip Van Winkle on stage – had requested a funeral at another church for his fellow actor and friend, George Holland.  Upon learning that the deceased had been an actor, the priest refused.  At the time, many considered actors to be unworthy of Christian burial. After some prodding by Jefferson, the priest suggested that “There is a little church around the corner where it might be done.”  Jefferson responded, “Then I say to you, sir, God bless the little church around the corner.”



"To this day, The Church of the Transfiguration maintains close ties to the theater.  The church has served as the national headquarters of the Episcopal Actors' Guild since its founding in 1923, by the third Rector, Dr. Randolph Ray.  The church itself was designated a United States Landmark for Church and Theater in 1973."

Such theatrical greats as Basil Rathbone, Tallulah Bankhead, Peggy Wood, Joan Fontaine, Rex Harrison, Barnard Hughes, and Charlton Heston have served as officers or council members of the Episcopal Actors' Guild. The Little Church's association with the theatre continued in the 1970s, when it hosted the Joseph Jefferson Theatre Company, which gave starts to actors such as Armand Assante, Tom Hulce, and Rhea Perlman.



The story of the church's nickname and its quiet little garden have attracted many couples from around the world who have chosen to be married here.



I decided to stop in for a few moments to reflect and pray.


Unfortunately, the main body of the church was closed and I had to take the photo above through the wavy glass window of the locked gate that was across the back of the Narthex.



The smaller "Chapel of the Holy Family," also known as The Bride's Chapel," was open, however, and I sat there in peace for awhile. Thousands of marriages have taken place before this altar!




I found this short Youtube video that shows more detail from inside the church, including the iconic Jefferson "Little Church Around the Corner" stained glass window.

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There is also a stained glass window inside the church called  the "Edwin Booth Window" by John La Farge, which portrays the noted actor in the role of Hamlet, which was given as a memorial by members of the Players Club in 1898. Booth was a member of this parish and the founder of the Players Club, which was formed, partly in reparation for his brother John Wilkes Booth's assassination of Lincoln, to provide a place where actors and non-actors could meet



A photo collage of the stained glass windows in the Chapel of the Holy Family.



The stained glass window in the Lady's Chapel.



Once again outside I left through the church's unusual Lychgate. Mrs. Franklin Delano (nee Laura Astor), great aunt of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, funded the construction of this gate in 1896. The gate is in need of repair and restoration, so the church has set up a fund to collect money to do both.  If you are charmed by the story of "The Little Church Around the Corner" and wish to learn how to contribute to this fund, I'm sure you can contact the Church through their website.



By the time I left the church the sky had brightened considerably, and so had my mood.  I walked south through Madison Square Park.....



...and waited for my husband at the subway stairs across from the Flatiron Building.




We then walked a few blocks over to the restaurant on East 27th Street. Can you see the Chrysler building in the photo above?



A closer view of the Chrysler Building's ornate top.


The glow emanating from the restaurant windows was welcoming ....



...as was the warm fire inside.

I have to say the day brightened for me in many ways. There is peace to be found in many ways in New York City -- a quiet church, a lovely park, the uplifting vistas of landmark buildings, and a favorite cozy restaurant where we have shared many good memories, all helped me feel better.

Where do you find the same experiences where you live? Where do you go to brighten your spirit?


I'm adding this post to Spiritual Sunday, Scenic SundaysSeasonal Sunday, Mellow Yellow Monday, Blue Monday, Mosaic Monday and Our World Tuesday. Many Thanks to the blog hosts!


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86 comments:

Barbara F. said...

Days like this are so necessary, good for the soul, I say. I am glad it helped to lift your spirits. It takes time, but you will soon feel like your old self, within the "new norm" (what I called life after the passing of a loved one.) We're here for you, Pat, if you need us. And yet again, I am always impressed at your photos. I remember this little church. xo

Kris said...

Oh how I love your blog!!! I do not remember seeing that church, but sure do wish I had. What gorgeous and ornate exterior architecture. I noticed the Chrysler building right away in that first photo. NYC is such an electric city. Boy do I want to go back!!!! I think we may have even eaten at that Italian restaurant you mention. Sounds familiar, and there was a fireplace too!!
Lovely!!!!

Marilyn said...

Such beautiful treasures you find in a big city.... Thank You !! January & February are always a trial for me. Sometimes I think winter, no matter how mild it is, will never end. Then before I know it ....out pops the buds of spring.
I just do needlework & read a lot in my blessedly warm house.
Have a Nice Weekend!!
Marilyn

podso said...

What a beautiful post--so nicely written with gentle emotion, and beautifully illustrated. What a wonderful day for you. I'm sure it must be hard as you will see your mother in so many places as you go through the day. I'm glad you find comfort in such places. Your husband sounds like an understanding, sensitive man! Have a good weekend,

dotsie

nannykim said...

Looks like a beautiful church. Where I go to brighten my spirit--one place is online to bloggers like you. I always find encouragement out here in blogland.

A second place I find it is at my little desk on my porch. I love to pray and look out the window at the sky scapes, and at the birds. Sometimes people walk across the way--it all is very comforting.

Being in grand churches--especially old cathedrals is a great place too!

Mary said...

It has been a grey winter so far, and I can only imagine how much worse it has been for you, Pat. To open our hearts to moments of peace, and to the beauty we find around us, is much needed at these times. (((hugs))) for you, my friend. xoxo

Vee said...

Oh I am glad that you spent some time at The Little Church Around the Corner. Sometimes just getting out of the house is so necessary. Your hubby is a sweetheart to take you out for dinner in that spot. You know, I always love your photography, but that first photo with the Chrysler building in the background is incredible...a pleasant gasp worthy photo. Love to you, Dear One.

Ciao Chow Linda said...

Grieving takes a long time Pat - and I know you are coping the best you can. How great that your husband made such a sweet offer to take you to dinner. I love the food at I Trulli too. I didn't know anything about that church, but I sure do now and want to visit it when I'm in that neighborhood. When I'm down, I always find the most solace in nature - especially walking along the tow path and the lake here in Princeton, watching the geese, the rowers and the tranquil water.

Riet said...

What a beautiful story and what a beautiful Church . I loved to read how you got to feel better during the day finding a quiet place to rest and pray. Your husband is the best to invite you for dinner in a great restaurant.
Have a good weekend Pat
Riet

Old Kitty said...

Awwww the little Church round the corner! I love it! I love how it got its nickname! What a story! And how beautiful and creative! I love churches that are truly "of the people", who welcome everyone and treat all as equals. Brilliant! I love how it allows for peaceful reflection in the midst of the hustle and bustle of the city! It's just lovely! I hope they raise the monies needed for the gate! Thanks for the pics and the info to this most charming of churches!

Take care
x

Michelle a.k.a. Farmchick said...

This is such a beautiful post. Both in words and thoughts. I love the shots of the church and of the city. I think joyful moments are where we happen upon them each day. They seem to surprise me when I need them the most.

La Petite Gallery said...

hard to believe a jewel like this still exists in that location.
What wonderful history. The chapel
reminds me of the benches in the ole north church in Boston.

thanks so much
yvonne

Maria M. Boyer said...

Pat,
I don't know where to start with my response. I'm continually amazed that as someone with some crowd and sensory issues, I can always find solace in what is often the madness of NYC. You've captured perfectly the types of things I find there. I think also, though, that I like the anonymity of the big city.

The other thing you've captured is the beauty of a church when no one else is in it. I have often said, I like church best when I'm alone. Then I truly can find the connection I sometimes think I have lost. I am not a church goer ... but I remain a believer.

Where do I go to brighten my spirits in my neck of the woods? High-end grocery stores and farmers' markets. What can I say: I've always found solace in food. I do enjoy a nice brisk walk on a mild but sunny day too. And I love music. I escape into a mix of Coldplay almost too often, I fear.

I love this post. I want to be the parrot to your pirate and be on your shoulder for all the wonderful experiences of your life.

I look forward to your next post.

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Awesome post, Pat... Love that Episcopal Church.. Hubby and I are Episcopalians --so this church was special to see. Thanks so much!!!

Your hubby is wonderful---giving you this experience to help perk you up some... That is terrific!!!! He's a keeper.

When I am 'down' about something, the first thing hubby asks is if we'd like to get out and take a ride in the country.. We also love to go out to dinner also...

Bless your heart. I know that you are sad now --and that's so understandable.

Hugs and Prayers,
Betsy

Ocean Breezes and Country Sneezes said...

What a lovely post, the story of this church recalled a memory of the little church in Philly with "pink nuns" a cloistered group.

I'm sorry about your spirits, hopefully the weather will improve. Last week on the 20th was a low day for me. Time will heal our hearts.

Hope you have a nice weekend!

Mary

LDH said...

A sweet, heartfelt post! Happy that you enjoyed the day that resulted in a lighter, brighter outlook. My mom passed away 4 months ago and I think of her every day. I haven't felt great sadness just miss her. I keep wondering when it will feel real...

Sarah said...

Pat, I'm glad you had this time in the city. A walk along the river trail helps me refocus and refuel. Our winter has been unusually warm too, but most of our days are sunny. Take care of yourself and know that you are thought of. ~ sarah

Lynn said...

Pat, I believe one of my ancestors was involved somehow in the beginning of this church. Let me get my sister, the genealogist, to check on it or just to remind me.

Betsy said...

What a wonderful post! You found that charming little church and had time to stop in and let it's beauty and God's love sink in a little bit. Then dinner with your sweetie was a wonderful end to the day.

Carol said...

I'm glad you were able to find a place to lift your spirits. I enjoyed learning about this amazing little Church around the corner. Wonderful post, Pat.

The Gathering Place said...

I also enjoyed your post. My mother-in-law is slipping away and it has taken me back to the time my parents passed away. Those times are hard and yet sweet, missing them so much. I love to drive some plaice beautiful when I feel sad, but music opens up my emotions faster than anything. A beautiful melody can heal my soul. Your mother must have been a great lady.

I hope to see your version of New York some day! Beautiful!

Tanna at The Brick Street Bungalow said...

Glad these beautiful moments and places helped lift your spirit, Pat. I know it is not an easy time. Blessings and hugs ~ tanna

ellen b. said...

Glad you were led to see and experience places that were good for the soul. Hugs and comfort to you!

Ola said...

the church looks very cosy among all these hight buildings!

here finally we have a real winter with snow and low temperatures but the beginning was very similiar to yours - rain & gloomy warm days

Trotter said...

Hi Pat! Sorry for the delay; Happy New Year!

Loved to revive this neighbourhood and the church is lovely!! Great pictures!!

Blogtrotter Two is leaving Corsica, finally... ;). Enjoy and have a great year ahead!!!

LR @ Magnificent or Egregious said...

Lovely post Pat, all my memories of visiting NYC just came flooding back to me, I love NYC so much. I adore experiences like you just mentioned, coming across a church or venue and taking the time to look around, admire, just be, creating a lovely memory.

merrilymarylee said...

Old churches are so lovely and Episcopal Churches are usually the most interesting to me. They often have lovely gardens in addition to their fascinating architecture with the nooks and curves. I love the Rip Van Winkle window!

When we lived in Memphis, one of the Episcopal Churches there had a flower festival in the fall and garden clubs and groups throughout the city festooned the church with garlands, wreaths, and lovely fall arrangements. It was breathtaking.

Jenny said...

So beautiful and peaceful. I'm glad you found the blessing of this place at a time your heart needs it.

Judy ~ My Front Porch said...

Beautiful little spot in the city...your 'church around the corner'. Thanks for taking us along on your visit....on a dreary January day. Your outing sounds like the perfect 'spirit-lifter'!

Susie said...

Pat, My mother has been gone since 2006. I truly get the blues on rainy days and miss her so much. I usually cry a little and pray a lot. I enjoyed your post , it helped me , thank you. Smiles to you, Susie(She Junks)

Charlotte said...

I've never been to NYC but have always wanted to. I'm glad you shared all these great photos and the history behind the very interesting church.
I'm so sorry for the loss of your mother. Fortunately we don't have too many days here when the sun doesn't shine. Right now it's 74 degrees. I know the weather can definitely affect one's mood. I still miss my mother and she's been gone for about 12 years now. We were always very close.
I'm glad you shared with us again on Spiritual Sundays.
Blessings,
Charlotte

Al said...

Nice shots - what an amazing church in the middle of all those huge buildings!

dede said...

And this is my little church around the corner, ciao Pat

http://varie-ed-eventuali-blog.blogspot.com/2009/08/la-piccola-chiesetta-dietro-langolo.html

CameraCruise said...

Lovely post!
What a beautiful church.
Have a great day.

Ginny said...

What an interesting little church!!! Parts of it do look quite Chinese. I wonder what their membership is? I never thought of N.Y. as peace and calm, but here you have shown this aspect of it! My prayers continue to be with you, my mom has been gone only a few years, it is hard.

Yvette said...

A very beautiful post, Pat. I'm glad you were able to spend a good day in such a peaceful venue.

New York can often be a haven of sorts. It's not all frenzied here and there as most people think.

What did you have for dinner?

Photos tomorrow?

Jeanne said...

Hi Pat, I know how hard it is to lose our moms. It does get much better but we will always feel like we just want to have a chance to talk to our mom once again. I love the beautiful church around the corner. I know one could find peace there. I'm glad you did. N.Y. is a magical place and the dinner out was a sweet idea for your hubs to offer to cheer you up.

You can tell my age when I remember almost all of the actors you mentioned. Smile.

We have had a ton of rain and temperate weather. Odd this winter so far.

Happy days to you dear Pat.
Hugs, Jeanne

diane b said...

A fabulous post, Pat. Not only do we get to visit the little church around the corner and learn its fascinating history but we get to share your personal grief and how you are coping with it. What a great way to make you feel better. New York never ceases to amaze me and thank you for bringing it alive for us.

Debbie Crawford said...

I've always wanted to visit New York. That church looks beautiful. As I have just moved to South Africa I haven't really found "my place" yet.

SavoringTime in the Kitchen said...

I learn so much about New York City coming here, Pat. What a charming church and interesting story of its name and history.

Sue said...

Pat, I'm glad you found some solace while visiting this special little church. It's stained glass windows are beautiful. Your life in the city is always such an adventure to share with us. :-)

steviewren said...

I'm glad you found some comfort in your day and that you have a thoughtful husband who knows how to lighten your load of sorrow. I love the name of the church...wouldn't it be great if all churches were thought of in such a sweet welcoming way?

When I'm feeling down, a visit with my daughter and her children is the best medicine for me. I'm thankful that they live nearby. There is nothing like a good dose of blue skies and sunshine to set any blah day aright! I hope you have many of those in the near future friend.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

It does look a lovely church and thanks for sharing its interesting history. You did have a lovely day!

black eyed susans kitchen said...

I enjoyed this post so much Pat! I love the little surprises that are tucked away in the city and this would be one of those. I also love old churches with interesting architecture and stories. I am also happy that it turned out to possibly be just what you needed that day. Comfort often comes in different guises.
♥, Susan

Vicki/Jake said...

Having my computer crash, I've missed seeing all the awesome things through your eyes. But It's fixed now and I can come take a peek. This makes me think of my trip to Boston a couple of years ago. I love all the history mixed in with progress... This church looks very peaceful. I'll take a quick peek at others I've missed too. And will be back for more...

eileeninmd said...

Hello Pat, thank you for sharing this lovely church. I have always loved the stained glass in churches. I am glad you seem to find peace in visiting this church and dinner with your hubby. Sounds like a nice day. Great post and photos.

GrandmaK said...

What a wonderful and a most informative post! Thank you!Cathy

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

That is so surprising in the big city. I'm glad you find these treasures and share with us! Happy Monday! ♥

A Garden of Threads said...

Hi Pat, I know how difficult it can be after losing a parent. I so glad you found some peace in the lovely church. Take care and have a wonderful week. hugs, Jen.

Lavender Cottage said...

Thank you sharing the story behind the little church around the corner that doesn't appear to be that small at all.
Judith

Pamela said...

This was an amazing and interesting post. How I loved seeing the little church around the corner through your eyes and camera lens. Thank you for taking time to write about it.

Blessings,
Pamela

Vagabonde said...

There are so many wonderful monuments, churches, museums, restaurants and on and on in New York City. I am pleased your found a peaceful place that made you feel better – this little church looks charming. I did not think we would go back so soon, but I have already purchased our flights to go back to NYC in May.

KarenHarveyCox said...

Pat,
Beautiful photography on your post. My friend Rob and his wife Ann Louise got married at that church. When I heard the name, I thought it was so charming. I always love your posts, because I learn something each time I visit.
Karen

Porch Days said...

What a lovely story of the Little Church Around the Corner. I can see how the day lifted your spirits.

Sandy said...

Your blog took me back a few years.. I lived in the same area for a time. Being one who has moved from States to Countries to states and then some it's odd for me to be in one place for any length of time...My two brothers and parents were born in your area but me, Tampa, Sister, San Francisco...
I wanted to thank you for your visit to my blog and now I need to go back and re more of yours.. a trip down memory lane...
Thanks
Sandy

Tracy said...

How beautiful is that little church! So sweetly tucked in between all the big city stuff. This church actually reminds me of one my husband & I saw in downtown Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Anyway, loved seeing this, and the vibrant street scenes of NYC! :o) Hoping your keeping well there, Pat... ((HUGS))

SmilingSally said...

In America, we seldom have such history. Thanks for the information about this beautiful place.

Happy Blue Monday, Pat.

Tanya said...

interesting history, beautiful photos to go with it!

wifetoalineman02 said...

what a beautiful church, great pictures too, like them all :-) visiting from MYM, hope that you can return the visit too.

http://www.mommies2ks.com/2012/01/pajama-day-at-school.html

Maggie said...

I enjoyed visiting the little church on the corner and taking a walk around Manhattan.
The restaurant looks so warm and welcoming.
I really must come back again soon.
Hope you have a great week.

Kim, USA said...

I bet many people do not know there is a church in that place. People seems very busy with life sometimes we don't look around. Great shots and thanks for sharing.

Yellow & Blue

bj said...

O, Mille....I so enjoyed this lovely church. Thanks for taking me along on the tour.
So glad you felt better by the time you had dinner with your sweetie in your favorite place.
hugs, bj

Regina said...

Beautiful church and history!
Thank you for sharing Pat.

Regards.
xo

Regina

Claudia said...

Not surprisingly, this is one of my favorite churches in NYC. It always brought peace. Rain does intensify sadness - you have such a healthy way of coping. The sunset photos are exquisite - they sing to a little rest and then a new beginning. When I need solace - I go to the lake.

Liza said...

Wonderful photos. Have a fabulous week.

Liz @ MLC

Cafe au lait said...

The church is beautiful

My Blue Monday.

(Queenmothermamaw) Peggy said...

So sad to read of your mom's passing. How blessed you and your mom were to have you with here at the end. Praying that peace will soon replace that empty feeling from losing her. Your post is so beautiful. You are our official New York guide and I always love your tours. The church is beautiful.
QMM

Lorrie said...

Beautiful photos, Pat, of a beautiful little church. I'm glad there are places like that in this world, sadly in need of comfort.

For me, spending time in nature is where I find comfort. Walking on a deserted beach, or along a forest path makes me realize how great God is, and how I can trust him with my problems.

Hugs,

cassandrasminicorner said...

It was a beautiful church! Thank's for sharing the photos:)

Visiting for BM! Hope you can stop by:)

http://www.cassandrasminicorner.com/2012/01/salt-soaking-solution.html

Gardening in a Sandbox said...

First of all what a sweet husband to invite you out to supper. The lovely little church seems to be dwarfed by the many tall buildings that have been built around it over the years. I has kept it specialness though. V

Ebie said...

It is a beautiful church, and I love your photos, with natural lighting! Those stained glass windows are pretty!

I used to work at the Flatiron Building many years ago!

Roberto Machado Alves said...

Beautiful photos and great text.

Have a great weekend.
Greetings from Roberto, Brazil

Cindy said...

What a sweet day you had. You are such a great story teller and I loved reading this one and seeing the beautiful little church. How wonderful that you found a place that brought peace to your grieving heart. God knew just what you needed that day.
I love to walk along the Red River. There is a path just a few block from our house. It never fails to revive my spirit.
Love and hugs, Cindy

Ann said...

Flatiron Building.

Is this the real name? iron it flat? They only had a thin strip of land?

Robert Geiss said...

Thank you for this amazing journey through a N.Y. day very much !


daily athens photo

wifetoalineman02 said...

beautiful views and amazing pictures, like them all :-) Visiting this time from Blue Monday, hope that you can return the visit too.

http://www.kandhistools.com/our-blue-cushion-seat/

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Wow, what a great interesting well documented post. What a great place. I had no idea that actors were such pariahs.

cassandrasminicorner said...

I am grateful that you shared these photos. Beautiful!

Visiting for MYM! Hope you can stop by:)

http://www.heavenly-dreams.com/green-mango-pickled/

Denise said...

Hi Pat,

This is such an interesting post!! My husband, myself, and our son, along with my husband's parents visited New York City in December 2005 (our Christmas gift from my in-laws). It was my first visit to New York, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. This Episcopal church you've shown us is just charming. I always like to know the history of a subject, as well. I'm glad your visit to the church made you feel better.

Thanks for visiting my blog and for your kind comments. Hope you have a great week!

Denise at Forest Manor

Theanne said...

I've heard of this church...but have never seen it, not even in photos! How lovely to see it and hear so much about it's history. My father had two great uncles who were entertainers (as were some of their children)...they started out as acrobats and eventually found their way to vaudeville...their circuit was mainly from New York City to the west coast and down to California (they were from Baltimore). Now that I've learned that churches would not even accept actors in their churches or cemeteries I understand even more about why I never heard a lot about these ancestors till I was in my late 40s. I knew that in their time, there was a stigma attached to being an actor or actress. I've had the feeling over the years that I've researched about these people, that my grandmother was made to feel less of a person because she had entertainers in her family. So it warms my heart to know there was an Episcopal church in NYC that took care of them and since my great great uncles were most likely Episcopalian (no doubt Anglican originally) as were the rest of their family they might possibly have gone to this church. Prayers for the good Rev. Houghton! And happiness that you found some measure of peace at this beautiful place!

Lisa @ Grandma's Briefs said...

A truly beautiful church. Love the stained glass, especially. I'm glad you found comfort and solace there. You're on my mind and in my prayers.

Gracie said...

After a 5 days trip to London, lots of due work at the office and a very bad flu that kept me in bed for 10 days, I finally got time to catch up! Reading you is always a great pleasure and this time was no different. How beautiful that little space of serenity and peace, thanks for sharing the place and your feeling with us. I'm sure time will heal your wounds and one day you will be just grateful for the time you had her. My thoughts are with you.

Kathleen said...

I hope today's beautiful weather brightened your spirits! It takes time Pat, she is at peace and with your dad. Try to think of that.
Beautiful church.

chubskulit said...

Gorgeous!

Visiting late from Blue Monday, my entry is HERE, have a great week!

Lovella ♥ said...

Oh dear Pat. What a lovely place to reflect and pray as you wait for the mourning to turn to joy again.
It is so hard isn't it?

I love the photos of the city and always wonder if I saw some of the same things and missed them in my hurry.

Chris said...

Hi Pat, what a wonderful blog. The pictures are absolutely gorgeous. I have never been to NY but I can see why you love it so much. The church is so beautiful. Thanks so much for sharing. I have recently found your blog and am now following you, and will visit often. Please stop by my blog and perhaps you would like to follow me also. Have a wonderful day. Hugs, Chris
http://chelencarter-retiredandlovingit.blogspot.com/