Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Lefferts Historic House Museum, Brooklyn, NY

I'm sure you'll be surprised to read that this beautiful authentic Dutch Colonial house is located in Brooklyn, NY!


It's the Lefferts Historic House Museum serving as a public museum within Prospect Park, on Flatbush Avenue, at the intersection of Empire Blvd. and Ocean Ave. It hosts free interactive exhibits, events, and seasonal educational programs for children.

This house was built in 1777 by Lt. Peter Lefferts, descendant of a New York Dutch family, on the site of his previous home, destroyed by fire in a military action at the beginning of the War for Independence at The Battle Of Brooklyn.


Members of the Lefferts family continued to live in the house until 1918, when they donated it to the City of New York. At that time Lefferts Homestead was moved several blocks from its location near Flatbush Avenue and Maple Street to its present location in Prospect Park.


Many of the exhibits and activities developed for the museum are geared towards children and were based on the diary of ancestor Gertrude Lefferts, whose records provide fascinating insight into the Dutch, African and Native heritage of the area. Activities such as needlework, writing with a quill and pen, candle and soap making, butter churning , cooking on a hearth, are held throughout the year, as well as seasonal events such as gardening and harvesting and annual the flax and fleece event.


If you'd like to watch some very interesting short videos about the house and it's history, go these links:
It's one of the gems of New York City!

35 comments:

Junie Moon said...

It's so hard to believe this is in Brooklyn as it looks like a lovely winter country scene from long ago.

Picket said...

Morning girl..great history lesson & no I never would have thought that to be in Brooklyn..it is so pretty & country...

Girl your snow pics are amazing..I'd be horrified if we got that much snow! lol lol Course the kids would love it...they be out building igloos! lol Have a great week my friend!

Lucy said...

What a stroke of incredible luck that some bozo didn't tear this wonderful piece of history down. The East tries to preserve it's history. I've noticed it a lot back there. The West rips it all down and covers it over with some service station or whatever. So many amazing building with history and memories gone. I can't figure that one out.

pve design said...

Oh, what a spot to see! You must come this way and see the "Phillips Manor" - "Cortland manor" - "Sunnyside" - all so rich with history!
Have you ever visited "Colonial Dames Historic Home" in the heart of Manhattan? A favorite spot of mine.
pve

Vee said...

Well, yes, I was indeed surprised. Wonderful location for keeping those early history lessons safe and able to be enjoyed by the city's children and adults alike.

TheWritersPorch said...

America is just full of wonderful old houses whose walls are full of history!Great photos!

Mermaid Queen said...

Hi Pat,
What a beautiful house, and your photo is right out of a movie. Thanks for the background on this lovely home. Oh and your grandson is gorgeous!
Martha
XOXO

Barb said...

Beautiful and a history lesson.Your grandson just gets cuter by the day....Barb

Willow said...

It does look like you took the photo in a time warp!

Lora said...

I love to visit historical sites! This place looks beautiful in the snow, too.

Gracie said...

It seems really an old house lost in the countryside, how strange is it? Thanks for sharing another aspect of your hometown.

Judy ~ My Front Porch said...

Now that is old...and beautiful...and so lovely in the snow! Thanks for sharing the story.

Jojo said...

You crack me up! I have been Jojo for 6 years now and my grandgirls wouldn't know my first name!

I love learning about historical sites to visit and you have showcased the house/museum beautifully in the snow.

A few years ago while visiting my girlfriend in Port Chester we went to visit Kykuit then drove around for a couple of hours looking at houses in the area. We took note of some of the painted ladies. My girlfriend used to volunteer with Philipsburg Manor. She learned something new every Saturday.

MuseSwings said...

Your snow pictures from yesterday and the beautiful historic house are wonderful - except for all the shoveling required. I lost track of you in bloggyland! I put you on my stalk list so I won't get lost in New York again.

Charli and me said...

Hello, I just love your blog. Your pictures are quite beautiful.

Marilyn said...

Hi, I came over from My Little Cottage in the Making to ask you for your trifle recipe :) I would love to make it for St Pats day. I thought maybe you could blog on it Marilyn

The Quintessential Magpie said...

I love these history lessons about NYC! Just a lovely place, and I love NYC's Dutch heritage. Thanks for sharing this part of it with us, Pat. You're a wonderful tour guide.

XO,

Sheila :-)

Catherine said...

Just beautiful. I never would have thought this was in Brooklyn.

Poetikat said...

It's amazing how these historic places get tucked away when newer buildings are erected around them. It is a beautiful home - reminds me of one here, in my city where they have costumed reenactments and bake bread and do quilting.

Kat

Lorrie said...

Pat this really is one of the gems of NYC. It's always amazing to me that houses can actually be moved! This one is just lovely!

steviewren said...

Pat, was that picture taken in today's snow? I would never guess that it is in the middle of Brooklyn. It looks like something you would find in the middle of the country.

Lisa said...

Pat, it's so lovely to meet you too! Your photos are aboslutely magnifucent. I could never get such clarity in a snow scene, but then again I'm a novice in that respect! A lot of people don't realize what Brooklyn has to offer due to Hollywood making it out to be this rough and tough area where mobsters, thugs and gangs flourish..lol

On another note, great to hear that you're a rabid (or somewhat rabid..just assuming, since most of us teeter around the 'rabid' level) Yankee fan! So looking forward to the season and hope to go to a few games in the new stadium - even though we may have to sell our home and first born to due so..LOL

~Cheryl said...

Amazing! I can't wait to visit the East Coast again. There is just so much to see.

Joanne Kennedy said...

What a beautiful house. But what a great find in Brooklyn.

Well, boo hoo! The house sale fell through just four days before escrow closed so my NY trip will have to be put on hold for awhile longer. I'm so sad!

Hugs,
Joanne

Rhonda Hartis Smith said...

Brooklyn is such a lovely place that I'm starting to get to know--thanks to you Pat! Remember the painting you named--Tranquil Moments? It won an Honerable Mention for me in an exhibition and I think it's because of your wonderful title.

Sue said...

That was exact thought when I first saw the picture....This is in Brooklyn?? It's lovely, I always love you city tours...You should write a guide book...

Betsy said...

That is a beautiful looking place! And the snow just adds to the charm, doesn't it? So many wonderful things to see where you live!

jeanne said...

Hello Pat, you did surprise me with the beautiful country home in Brooklyn. Your history lesson as always, was very interesting. I didn't realize the Dutch had a lasting impression in the City of NY.

Hugs and thank you Pat for one of the most interesting blogs I love to visit.

Jeanne

kari and kijsa said...

That looks like the countryside instead of NYC! Great post!

blessings, kari & kijsa

Susie Q said...

What a beautiful sight...I am so happy to see it still here for all to enjoy. Your posts of local beauty just make me so happy!

Stay warm!

Love,
Sue

Melanie said...

What a wonderful place. Oxfordshire UK has a similar place helping to educate children in the historical rural pastimes of the area at Coggs Manor Farm. It is a joy that such places have survived and can still teach a lot to new generations. Thanks for sharing Pat.

Cynthia said...

Whenever I come to New York, I want you to take me around. I am serious.

Lisa B. said...

It is amazing how those little pockets of rural history survive in the center of big cities! Very cool!!

Paz said...

This is beautiful setting. I'm enjoying all the pearls of Brooklyn with which you present us. Thank you!

Paz

Laura @ the shorehouse. said...

Another great local history lesson from the fabulous Fiori Favoriti!! :-) I can't wait to show my mom this post. She's going to love it. I agree with the comment...it's really incredible that it wasn't plowed to the ground over time. My mom's whole block of Victorian rowhouses in Flatbush...the house she grew up in...highrise apartment buildings now.